MU Interim Chancellor reacts to newly released Melissa Click video

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COLUMBIA - Interim Chancellor Hank Foley said he is angry over a newly released video showing Melissa Click getting into an argument with Columbia police officers at the Mizzou Homecoming parade back in October.

The body camera video (see below) of one Columbia police officer obtained by the Columbia Missourian shows Click telling the officers to "back off" when she was trying to protect protesters who stood in front of former UM System President Tim Wolfe's car.

The MU News Bureau released a statement in which Foley said:

Her conduct and behavior are appalling, and I am not only disappointed, I am angry, that a member of our faculty acted this way. Her actions caught on camera last October, are just another example of a pattern of misconduct by Dr. Click—most notably, her assault on one of our students while seeking  ‘muscle’ during a highly volatile situation on Carnahan Quadrangle in November. We must have high expectations of members of our community, and I will address these new revelations with the Board of Curators as they work to complete their own review of the matter.”

In a statement to MU faculty and staff Foley said:

Her conduct and behavior on this video as well as the video from the events on Nov. 9 are not consistent with that which is expected of a faculty member. We must have high expectations of members of our community, and I will address these new revelations with the Board of Curators as they work to complete their review of the matter."

During MU's Homecoming parade students wearing shirts that stated "1839 was built on my b(l)ack" locked arms. As police ordered the protesters off the street and onto the sidewalk, Click spread her arms in front of the protesters and briefly confronted officers. Foley called it a  "verbal assault against members of the Columbia Police Department.'

Click has also been under fire after a viral video showed her getting into a confrontation with a student journalist back in November during campus protests.

Click was charged with a misdemeanor third-degree assault on Jan. 25.

Click entered into a "deferred prosecution agreement" with City Prosecutor Stephen Richey on Jan. 29, meaning that Click, in exchange for a promise of future legal conduct and some waived defenses, will only need to do 20 hours of community service work.

If Click violates the terms of this agreement, the city will resume prosecution.

WARNING: The language use in this video could be considered offensive. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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