mu research day

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COLUMBIA - The University of Missouri's medical research students will get the chance to display projects Thursday at the School of Medicine.

The one-day symposium, Health Sciences Research Day, allows undergraduates, medical students, nursing students, health professions students, as well as pre- and postdoctoral trainees to present projects they've been working for months or even years on.

School of Medicine associate dean for research, Jerry Parker, said there will be more than 200 presentations for visitors to see Thursday, which is an integral part of MU being a research university.

"The importance of our research culture really matters," Parker said. The amount of presentations we'll have gives some indication how important students are to our overall research enterprise."

The event, which takes place in the long, sky-lit hallway at the School of Medicine, Acuff Atrium, will have multiple parts to it. A keynote address will be giving by Dr. Jeremy Veenstra-Vanderweele, regarded as one of the foremost experts on autism according to Parker.

"We'll also have a special seminar on 'Ask Me About My Research,' which is a program to help our faculty and students be able to present their research more effectively to the general public," Parker said. "Furthermore, we're going to have an 'Art of Science' display, which we're very excited about, which will have scientific images from microscopes and various other aspects of the laboratory work which are very beautiful and compelling images."

There will also be awards given out to original research projects in several different categories.

Parker said the students that have worked so hard for this day are appreciated for their time and dedication.

"We want to recognize the hard work that our students have done, how much we appreciate and value their contributions and to recognize really outstanding accomplishments as we see them," Parker said.

The event takes place at the Acuff Atrium on One Hospital Drive in Columbia from 9-11 a.m. and it is free and open to the public.

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